Reviews

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Sol Republic Master Tracks XC Review by Pocket-Lint

25/03/2014

When Sol Republic announced that it had got Calvin Harris to studio tune its XC headphones, we felt a wave of apathy. Was such a branding exercise really necessary?
But when we took a closer look at these cans something about them stood out. We just had to get a pair in and listen to as much music as we could to see if these over-ears could deliver on the three-point mantra that any good pair of headphones needs to achieve: they need to be solid, comfortable and deliver great sound.

Tick boxes at the ready, it seems like our gut reaction was bang on – and there’s more to these cans that just a well-known producer flogging his name to shift a few more pairs. Are the Sol Republic Master Tracks XC headphones able to earn their keep for the £230 cover price?

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iRobot Roomba 780 Review by TrustedReviews

25/03/2014

How busy are you, really? If you are considering spending the best part of £500 on a device to assist with the vacuuming then the obvious riposte would be to suggest you take a long, hard look in the mirror. The surprising news, however, is in this case you may come away from it smiling. 

iRobot has been in the robot vacuuming business since 2000 and the ‘Roomba 780’ is the company’s latest and greatest. After selling 7.5m units worldwide over the last 12 years the circular form factor is well known, but much of what is inside the 780 is brand new.

The 780 is the flagship of iRobot’s new top of the line 700 series and core to this is the upgraded iAdapt navigation system. This monitors the surrounding area making 64 checks per second to both track its way around objects and to gradually learn the complete layout of its cleaning environment. The result is the 780 can then apply the most relevant cleaning motion to each space, be it long sweeps, circular motions when detecting dirt heavy spots (iRobot calls this ‘Persistent Pass Cleaning’) or free form movement around cluttered or small spaces

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Gopro Hero3+ Black Edition Review by CNET

24/03/2014

The GoPro Hero3 is 25 percent lighter than the previous-generation Hero 2’s camera. It’s also 30 percent smaller. However, all of that reduction manifests in reduced thickness with a new depth of only 20mm. The height and width (42mm by 60mm) are unchanged to maintain compatibility with GoPro’s line of BacPac add-on modules and rear doors for the clear plastic shell.

On the front panel, you’ll find the new f/2.8, six-element aspherical lens that is supposed to offer twice the image sharpness and reduce the amount of barrel distortion at the extremes of its 170-degree field of view. However, the characteristic fish-eye look of the video and photos captured by the Hero3 hasn’t been totally removed, as it’s sort of a hallmark of the action-camera style, adding a bit of drama to scenery as it speeds by.

The Hero3 uses the same improved LCD of the Hero 2, with its monochromatic dot-matrix display. I found the screen to be easy enough to navigate using the GoPro’s combination mode/power button to change modes and the shutter release to make selections. However, there is a bit of a learning curve. Expect to spend a bit of time on your first outing just looping through the menus and getting used to where the options are. I also found the LCD to be a bit difficult to read in direct sunlight.